Electric bike Weight

The weight of an electric bike is essential to its performance, but what is a reasonable weight for an e-Bike? Cycling an electric bike without power should be no harder than cycling a traditional bicycle with a bag of shopping or a small child. The heaviest parts of an electric bike are the battery, the frame, and the motor.

 

Frame

Lightweight frames are always good unless you plan to do serious off-roading where a lightweight frame sometimes sacrifices flexibility and strength. e-Bikes have to pass more stringent tests than traditional cycles.

 

Battery

Lightweight batteries are really coming along and in the more expensive bikes will usually provide power equivalent to the uncompromising heavy batteries. Beware though as some models do sacrifice power and battery life in order to reduce weight.

With e-Bikes, you have power for the hills as well as secure and safe handling. Within reason, the moderate increase in weight of an e-Bike is really not much of an issue. It may need greater consideration if you expect to lift the bike up a flight of stairs etc.

The weight of the electric bike will depend on the model selected for your intended use and e-Bikes specified with all the comforts for city use with cushy saddle, puncture-protected tires, mudguards, carrier, lights, chainguard, etc will clearly be heavier than an e-Bike that comes in a stripped-down format. The range you require (how far it can go on a charge) will also dictate the battery capacity and therefore battery weight.

Here is a guide for city use based on the required range.

 

5-10 miles – 200Wh battery – 17-20Kg

20-40 miles – 300Wh battery – 17-22Kg

30-60 miles –  400Wh battery – 18-24Kg

40-80+ miles – 500Wh+ battery – 18-25Kg

 

The above weights are perfectly practical for electric bikes. When considering the battery capacity needed to achieve a required range, an allowance is made for winter performance drop and lifetime performance drop (batteries temporarily work less effectively in cold weather, and their overall performance decreases with age).

 

Motor

The component that provides a turning force to assist your pedaling.

Through continuous improvement and innovation, motors are becoming smaller but like any of the latest technology, the best ones are more expensive. Better motors will have lighter, more durable materials and sometimes they will be smaller in size and weight while still offering the same power output.

There are 3 main types of motors used on e-Bikes and there are pros and cons to each.

 

Other posts in this series:

Electric bike buying guide (part 1/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 2/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 3/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 4/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 5/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 6/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 7/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 8/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 9/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 10/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 11/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 12/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 13/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 14/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 15/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 16/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 17/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 18/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 19/20)
Electric bike buying guide (part 20/20)

 

 

 

Menu
Social profiles